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FAQs

General Information

  1. What makes the IDS Project work?
  2. How can the IDS Project benefit your library and its users?
  3. How is the IDS Project structured?
  4. How do I join the IDS Project?

ILL Information

  1. How does the IDS Project compare to traditional ILL?
  2. What effect will the IDS Project have on our workflow?
  3. What is the expected turnaround time for IDS Project requests?
  4. What reports does the IDS Project provide?
  5. What ILL Tools are used by the IDS Project?
  6. How does the IDS Project handle borrowing requests?
  7. What steps are involved in IDS Project lending?

General Information

  1. What makes the IDS Project work?

  2. The primary reason for the success of the IDS Project is community focus on effective best practices in resource sharing. The Project places a great deal of emphasis upon support and collaboration. Central to this is the mentor program, which assigns volunteer applications and systems specialists from current member libraries to each new member. Through both onsite visits and regular communications, the mentors help the staff at the joining library to configure ILLiad, optimize their workflows, and implement the technical requirements of the IDS Project. This also helps build personal relationships that form the foundation of a strong community, which gathers every year for the IDS Project Conference. The IDS Project’s listserv provides another forum for members to stay connected throughout the year, further strengthening the IDS Project’s community.

    Library staff may diagnose transaction problems by using the IDS Transaction Performance Analysis Module (TPAM). This reporting system is connected to each of the member libraries' SQL server, allowing for the real-time generation of transaction reports for the entire Project or just a pair of libraries.

    Working with Atlas Systems, the IDS Project has developed a next generation eJournal Availability Service called Article Licensing Information Availability Service (ALIAS) that allows ILLiad to perform unmediated article request processing using each library's electronic journal holdings (year, volume, issue) and its corresponding licensing data. ALIAS is able to construct a lender string and send article requests straight to OCLC. Like Direct Request, this can free up an average of 10 to 20 hours of staff time and decreases the turnaround time for article requests—especially since ALIAS promotes electronic over print holdings. Unlike OCLC’s Direct Request, ALIAS also performs load leveling.

    IDS Project libraries are committed to performance standards of 48-hour turnaround times for articles and 72-hour turnaround time for books. IDS libraries do not charge any fees for lending.

  3. How can the IDS Project benefit your library and its users?

    IDS Project library users benefit from a larger, more diverse collection of materials, faster delivery, higher quality for reproduction and bibliographic accuracy, and easy 24/7 access to articles through electronic delivery to the web. Library staff benefit from working with their peers in a community of libraries committed to the IDS Project's high standards for excellent customer service. The IDS Project develops and shares ILLiad best practices using the Workflow Toolkit. New library staff will benefit from the support of the IDS Mentoring Program which provides additional on-site training and support. Staff also benefit because they are able to run a paperless resource-sharing operation. The library benefits from a lower cost per transaction having optimized their workflow.

  4. How is the IDS Project structured?

  5. The IDS Project consists of libraries within New York State, ranging from community colleges to doctoral-granting institutions. All of these libraries are using ILLiad, Odyssey, Direct Request (unmediated processing), and the Empire Library Delivery.

    The Project works in partnership with the Office of Library and Information Services (OLIS), and the New York Regional Library Councils. OCLC, Atlas Systems and Serials Solutions also support the IDS Project.

  6. How do I join the IDS Project?

  7. Any library within New York State is encouraged to join the IDS Project. There is a $1,500 fee associated with membership; and, members must subscribe to OCLC and the ILLiad Resource Sharing Management system.

    If you are interested in joining the IDS Project, please contact Mark Sullivan, the Project Executive Director, at director@idsproject.org or 585-245-5172.


ILL Information

  1. How does the IDS Project compare to traditional ILL?

  2. IDS Project libraries are committed to a community focus on effective best practices in resource sharing, thereby significantly improving performance standards.

    The IDS Project's goal is to improve user service by meeting 48-hour turnaround times for articles and 72-hour turnaround time for books. IDS libraries do not charge any fees for lending materials. Lending to other libraries is just as important as borrowing for our own patrons.

  3. What effect will the IDS Project have on our workflow?

  4. The IDS project will have a positive effect on workflow because the Project has a set of common goals and all libraries use the same sending and receiving methods.

    Direct Request and custom holdings are used for books, and all libraries within the Project have a priority custom holdings group set up for Project libraries. With Direct Request turned on, routine loan requests are automatically sent to the first library without staff intervention.

    IDS staff also uses a custom holdings group for articles which are delivered to the web. ILLiad /Odyssey is used to automatically transfer articles to the web if a library is designated as a Trusted Sender.

    The Workflow Toolkit has over 100 ideas on improving workflow.

  5. What is the expected turnaround time for IDS Project requests?

  6. The performance standards for turnaround time are defined as follows:

    • The average time from receipt of a request to actual article delivery will be no longer than 48 hours but most articles are delivered within 24 hours.
    • The average time from receipt of a request to actual loan delivery will be no longer than 72 hours and between Empire Library Delivery zones no longer than 96 hours.
    • Use eJournal Availability Service to discover ILL rights for eJournal held by your library and other IDS Project libraries.
    • Use ALIAS to unmediated article requesting using data from the eJournal Availability Service.
  7. What reports does the IDS Project provide?

  8. The IDS Transaction Reports pull data from each of the members' SQL servers. Real-time statistics are available at all times to all member libraries by accessing the IDS Project website. The website allows for access to data from each of the member libraries or from all of them at once. This encourages continuous assessment and results are shared with all participants.

    The reporting system produces four main reports for the member libraries. The first report is a chart of the average times for either article or loan requests between a borrowing and lending library pair. The second report is the average times for a borrowing-lending pair broken down into six transaction segments. This report can be used to diagnose problems with workflow, Direct Request, Trusted Sender, and delivery. The third report is a listing of all of the article or loan transactions between a borrowing-lending pair. From the third report, you are able to link to the final report which is the complete tracking history of an individual request from the perspective of both library pairs.

  9. What ILL Tools are used by the IDS Project?

  10. The OCLC ILLiad Resource Sharing Management System, Transaction Performance Analysis Module (TPAM), Article Licensing Availability Service (ALIAS), eJournal Availability Service, and Getting It System Toolkit (GIST).

  11. How does the IDS Project handle borrowing requests?

  12. The IDS Project handles borrowing requests using the standard ILLiad and OCLC processes. We do make certain that the libraries are using custom holdings, Direct Request for loans and the IDS Availability Service for electronic journals.

  13. What steps are involved in IDS Project lending?

  14. The IDS Project handles borrowing requests using the standard ILLiad and OCLC processes but we have added the IDS Availability Service. The IDS Availability Service allows for each lending library to determine if they can send an article electronically based on access to the actual article and the licensing agreement with the provider, using a union catalog that looks up licensing data from an IDS Project Generic Rights Management database.